Challenge 1, Continued

Did you make it to the library in the last week to give Challenge 1: Hero Tales a try? I hope you did and that you found lots of good books to fuel your child’s imagination. It inspired my 7-year old to pull out his medieval castle play set last week and act out some of the King Arthur scenes we read about.

By the way, if your library is lacking in its children’s book selection, you might try looking in your child’s school library as well. Most librarians would love to facilitate parents’ efforts to expose their children to more stories!

I went back to our public library this week and found a few more to add to our list of recommended hero tales. Continue reading

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Challenge 1: Hero Tales

For our first challenge, let’s hone in on hero stories. We could go a lot of different ways with the idea of heroes, mostly because every story has a hero (whether the hero is likeable or not, or desirable as a role model for our children or not). So let’s narrow our focus to hero stories in two genres: Bible stories and folklore.

What is the importance of hero stories? My husband, a sixth grade teacher, said recently that he can tell who in his classroom has been exposed to hero stories and who hasn’t. Those who have can talk at length about these heroes and others like them—Superman, Robin Hood, historical figures, etc. Those who haven’t have created their own heroes, usually drawing from pop culture icons. They are searching for something to fill the void. (more…)

A Reading Challenge for You and Your Children

When my son Seth was about three years old, we went to the library together at least once a week. We would see friends there with their kids, checking out two or three books—so reasonable and moderate. I told myself, I’m not going to break my library bag this week; we’re only going to get a few books. And yet every time, we left with the bag full to the top, mostly of storybooks and occasionally some nonfiction books. Seth loved whatever we got, as long as someone was willing to read it to him, and I loved picking the books out for him.

Around the same time, I began teaching a children’s literature class at a local university. Every week before class, I made a big trip to the library to collect books that I wanted to share with the students, based on the genres (types of books) we were studying that week. I knew a lot of titles and authors from my years as a middle school reading teacher and from my own childhood. But some genres were not my “go-to” areas in the children’s library: folklore, science fiction, memoir, historical fiction, graphic novels.

The class made me dive into these genres and others. I scoured the shelves looking for authors I recognized, attractive illustrations, cultural variations. I loved it, Seth loved it. It spiced up our reading and exposed him to books he might not otherwise have known, some that have become favorites, like Steven Kellogg’s folklore books The Three Sillies and Pecos Bill, and the Let’s Read and Find Out nonfiction series by different authors. Continue reading